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STEM Jobs with the FBI

Did you know that your studies in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) could lead to a career with the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)? The FBI needs people such as biologists, computer scientists, and electronic engineers to carry out investigations into terrorism, espionage, corruption, and other crime.

Biologists are needed for forensic analysis of crime evidence and comparing DNA between victims and suspects. Specializations include Forensic Examiner, Technical Specialist, DNA Program Specialist, Research, Program Managers, Supervisor, and Unit Chief. Forensic Examiners, for example, provide their analysis of evidence to law enforcement, who then carry out their own investigations. Technical specialists are responsible for the digital storing of forensic evidence and educating law enforcement about new technologies that may assist them. For all biologist roles, requirements included at least a bachelor’s degree in biology, chemistry, or forensic science, with higher degrees preferred. If you don’t have these degrees, candidates with a “combination of education and experience with course work equivalent to a major, plus appropriate experience or additional education” are still considered.

Computer Scientists focus on preventing cybercrime. With such technical skills, “you are going to see the direct effect of your work,” FBI Special Agent Avatar LeFevre explains. “You are going to see people’s lives saved. You are going to see money being returned to victims of fraud. You are going to see the mitigation of terror attacks.” Requirements include a bachelor’s degree in Computer Science. If your degree is in something else, you can still be eligible so long as 15 of your 30 semester hours were in statistics and math, including differential and integral calculus.

The Electronic Engineer — Forensic Examiner (EE-FE) position ensures that electronic devices used for forensic analysis are working properly and that digital evidence is properly analyzed and preserved. Requirements include a bachelor’s degree in engineering with at least one program accredited by ABET (Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology) and courses in differential and integral calculus, physics, fluid mechanics, and thermodynamics, among other subjects. Full requirements can be found here.

If you want to find out more about STEM opportunities in the FBI, make an appointment with a career coach.

Sources:

“FBI Laboratory Positions.” fbi.gov, Federal Bureau of Investigation, https://www.fbi.gov/services/laboratory/laboratory-positions

“Forensic Examiner Talent Network.” FBI Jobs, Federal Bureau of Investigation, https://apply.fbijobs.gov/psc/ps/EMPLOYEE/HRMS/c/HRS_HRAM_FL.HRS_CG_SEARCH_FL.GBL?Page=HRS_APP_JBPST_FL&Action=U&FOCUS=Applicant&SiteId=1&JobOpeningId=22694&PostingSeq=1&utm_source=HCG_Indeed_JP_FE&utm_medium=Referral&utm_campaign=HCG_Indeed_JP_FE&.

“STEM and the FBI Recruiting the Best and the Brightest.” fbi.gov, Federal Bureau of Investigation, 8 Nov. 2017, https://www.fbi.gov/news/stories/fbi-stem-recruiting-efforts.

“STEM Careers.” FBI Jobs, Federal Bureau of Investigation, https://www.fbijobs.gov/career-paths/stem

Photo courtesy of the FBI

Originally posted at Career UConn Blog